Is it possible to naturally infuse honey with cannabis oil… by running it through bees? That’s the goal the enterprising folks at Cousin Andy set out to achieve in the video below:

But combining the health benefits of cannabis and honey into one naturally-produced (and tasty) substance isn’t as easy as enticing bees to sit on some spare weed. Since cannabis contains no floral nectar, bees cannot pass cannabinoids into honey simply by landing on cannabis.

Thankfully Cousin Andy had a workaround:

By using a special formulated syrup, we were able to feed a single hive 20,000 milligrams of THC. With such a high level of THC the health of the hive was in question. An article written in 2001 assured us that bees would be unphased by THC because of a lack of CB receptors. All cannabinoids should, in theory, be passed thru the bees and into their honey.

Four hives were purchased and set up all at the same time. Our beekeeper was nervous the experiment would kill the hive, so the weakest and smallest one was selected. The test hive was fed our special syrup while the other three hives were fed a simple syrup.

Not only did the test hive survive the “special syrup” — it flourished. Its honey production thrived and it was the first hive to fill its box, becoming the only hive of the four to create a new queen.

If this sort of thing sound familiar, it’s because earlier this year Cannahoney drove the internet wild when its creator claimed to have trained bees to make honey “from any strain” of cannabis. But as of today Cannahoney “makes no claims regarding any cannabinoid content” in its product.

Not so with the batches produced in the video above. Cousin Andy had the resulting honey tested at Sequoia Analytical Labs, and just one ounce of the “amazing tasting” product contained 16.29 milligrams of THC, 2.92 milligrams of CBD, and 3.12 milligrams of CBN.

Or, as they succinctly put it: “The bees successfully infused their honey with cannabis oil.”

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